Peace, stability can be brought to JK through honest administration: Rajnath

Singh said development and good governance had remained elusive for the people of Jammu and Kashmir and the central government was committed to taking all possible measures to bring accountability and transparency in the system

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Rajnath Singh

Srinagar: On his first visit to Jammu and Kashmir after the imposition of Governor’s rule, Union Home Minister Rajnath Singh said on Thursday that peace and stability could be brought to the State through an honest, effective and efficient administration.

Singh said this after reviewing the security situation in the State at a high-level meeting attended by Governor NN Vohra, National Security Advisor Ajit Doval and top civil and police officials here.

“The dream of a developed and prosperous Jammu and Kashmir will be realised when there is peace and normalcy in the State. It is our firm resolve to bring peace, stability and prosperity through an honest, effective and efficient administration for the problems facing the State,” a statement quoted him as saying.

Discussing the way forward for the state, Singh said development and good governance had remained elusive for the people of Jammu and Kashmir and the central government was committed to taking all possible measures to bring accountability and transparency in the system.

“With a renewed focus on good governance and development, the Centre is looking forward to kindling new aspirations and hopes amongst the people of the State,” he said.

The home minister said the solution to problems lies in the empowerment of the people and strengthening the institutions of local self-government.

Jammu and Kashmir were placed under governor’s rule on 20 June after the BJP withdrew support to alliance partner PDP, prompting Mehbooba Mufti to resign as chief minister.

The rift between the two parties widened following the central government’s decision to resume anti-terror operations in the State after Ramzan.

The PDP of Chief Minister Mehbooba Mufti asserted that the Centre needed to reach out to the separatists. The Centre argued that the separatists lost an opportunity as they did not take a cue from civil society.

The alliance between the BJP and the PDP, parties with widely divergent views, had been shaky since the beginning. The rift showed from time to time— over PDP’s promises of talks with separatists, the proposal to remove the AFSPA (the Armed Forces’ Special Powers Act under which grants special powers to the army in insurgency-hit areas), and even the rollout of the government’s flagship Goods and Services Tax.