Monday 26 October 2020

Indians On Foreign Soil Fighting War Of Narratives With No Support

If there is no ecosystem to support the counter-narrative, Indians can't be blamed for joining the leftist-Islamist cartel for security

The plight of Siddhartha Gupta who was sacked by SAP America Inc for sharing the truth about the Tablighi Jamaat under the influence of Muslim gangs on Twitter has once again highlighted the lonely battle Indians in foreign countries are facing while trying to reverse the narrative set by the leftist-Islamic cartel worldwide. This hostility — both in real life and in the virtual world — is not new. In 2018, a tweet from a turncoat of a columnist who had switched camps from the left to the right — when Narendra Modi was rising on the national scene and who dumped the camp towards the end of the first term of the BJP government — had cost the job of chef Atul Kochhar in Dubai, the United Emirates. While Indian Twitter and Facebook users are temporarily and then permanently banned for bringing to the fore excesses of the Muslim community and transgressions by the Communist Party of China, when abroad, any attempt to challenge the discourse meets the invariable consequence of an end to one’s livelihood. In sharp contrast, the attacks on Hindus by Muslims, Christians and communists go unnoticed and unpunished.

While the UAE in the Middle East and the US in the West are hardly hubs of Muslim radical elements, the authorities in these countries share the urge to stay ‘secular’, ‘pluralist’ and ‘neutral’, which of course does not stop the ilk of The New York Times and The Washington Post from publishing blatant lies about India and Indians. But an Indian, if he must keep his job, must be extra careful. Of course, this caution is all the more warranted, given the tendency betrayed by many an Indian to go berserk once he or she is no longer on the Indian soil. But then, the ideologically rival camp can be as careless as they want to be in their utterances and public conduct. Bangladeshi infiltrators rape a nun in West Bengal in 2015 and the mainstream media in India attributes the crime to Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh and gets away with it. Sirf News‘ editor had posted a video showing a group of Muslims beating a naga sadhu mercilessly. When the ‘fact-checking’ staff could not pull the video down in the name of fake news, they banned him for three days from the medium for “promoting nudity”!

Fighting prejudice and anti-Hindu bias in media and public commentary is a tougher call for Indians overseas. To reverse the direction of the discourse is a near-impossible task if the Indian is a salaried employee in an alien society. Not only does his or her family depend on what the NRI earns, but the job also lessens the consumption of employment in the country. As noticed among communist rabble-rousers, few, if any, do regular jobs. They can dare because they have less at stake; the institutional support a leftist journalist or activist enjoys, while not enough for a high lifestyle, addresses the bread-and-butter concern. When the person acquires a star status among anarchists, the perks are better than those in any regular job, allowing one to live in multiple bungalows and farmhouses like Prashant Bhushan, in a prime Delhi property like Arundhati Roy after writing just one book or hog the television screen for intellectual skullduggery like Yogendra Yadav. So that there can be a counter-narrative, an ecosystem must evolve with tacit support from the present Indian government. Why wouldn’t Indians in foreign countries otherwise move safely to the camp of perpetual rebels, pretend to be too dumb to be political? They are but vulnerable if they choose to be honestly expressive.

Sirf News Editorial Board
Sirf News Editorial Boardhttps://www.sirfnews.com
Voicing the collective stand of Sirf News' (सिर्फ़ News') editors on a given issue