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Tuesday 7 April 2020

Hindu expatriates from Bangladesh hail CAA

In an email sent to members of news media, eminent non-residential Hindu Bangladeshis thank the Indian parliament for its humanitarian act

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Expatriates of the Hindu community from Bangladesh have welcomed India’s amended Citizenship Act. Many recognisable Hindu Bengali faces from across the world are adding their signatures to an email campaign, mentioning their names and the organisations they head or represent otherwise to endorse the changed Indian law.

The email reads:

We, the expatriate Hindus and other religious and ethnic minorities of Bangladesh living around the globe fully support the Citizenship Amendment Act (2019) passed by the Parliament of India. This is a humanitarian act towards humanity.

The horror of partition, that was forced on the innocent Hindus and other non-Muslim populations who lived in the east and west of the Indian subcontinent in 1947, continues to haunt them through various forms of discrimination in Bangladesh, Pakistan and Afghanistan. The Liaquat-Nehru Pact of 1950 – through which refugees were to be allowed to return to dispose of their property, rescue abducted women and children, recover looted property, un-recognize forced religious conversions, and confirm minority rights – was never realized.

Not only that, in India, Hindu refugees from East Pakistan and later from Bangladesh had to hide and forge documents to become citizens of India. Through this Act, India has partially fulfilled its duty to the millions of non-Muslims from Bangladesh, Pakistan and Afghanistan who had to flee to India in recent years, but could not claim their rights in India. CAA has given them the right.

We also want to remind that close to 20 million Hindus, Buddhists and Christians still live in Bangladesh. These populations want to remain in their motherland Bangladesh with security and dignity. Their presence there creates a potential that Bangladesh could become a more tolerant nation where militant Islam would not find a stronghold. We hope the Indian Government will continue to work for the wellbeing of the beleaguered non-Muslim population of Bangladesh as they work with others to provide a bulwark against Islamic extremism in the Indian subcontinent.

The following Hindu expatriates have so far added their names to the endorsement.

Arun Datta, Bangladesh Minority Rights Alliance, Toronto (BMRA), Canada

Arun Barua, Bangladesh Minority Council, Geneva

Arun Debnath, Harrow, London, UK

Asha Devi, Ayurved läkare, Göteborg, Sweden

Ajit Saha. Utsav, London.UK

Bishnu Gopal Chatterjee, Vancouver, Canada

Bimal Pramanik, Centre for Research in Indo-Bangladesh Relations (CRIBR), Kolkata.

Bimal Kumar Chakraborty, Manosri Tarun Bani Mandir, Howrah, WB.

Dr Bishwajit Roy, President SBLA, UK

Chitra Paul, Hindu Forum, Sweden

Dileep Karmaker, Bangladesh Minority Coalition (BMC), Montreal, Canada.

Dipan Mitra, World Hindu Federation, Bangladesh

Dinesh Mujumder, Bangladesh Hindu Coalition, USA

Dabasish Roy, Secretary, United Hindu Cultural Association London (UHCAL)

Ira Datta, Durga Mandir, Toronto

Joy Das, Canada

Kaberi Das, Gopal Das, Sanatan Accocian.UK

Dr Mohit Ray, Campaign Against Atrocities on Minorities in Bangladesh, (CAAMB), Kolkata

Dr Niranjan Ray, Ph.D., Los Angeles, USA

Margareta Andersson, Spc, medicine and health care company, Sweden

Marie Mandakini Spannare, Hindu Forum EU

Noni Gopal Paul, President, United Hindu Cultural Association London (UHCAL)

Premananda Deb Nath, Moscow, Russia

Pardip Kumar Kukreja, Global Hindu Federation, Malaysia

Prokash Gupta, Hindu Coalition, New York.

Pranab Chowdhury, Bangladesh

Ramendra Nandi, Indian Intellectual Forum, NJ

Rosaline Costa, Hotline Bangladesh.

Rumki Das, Canada

Rabikar Chowdhury, Bangladesh

Rina Das, London, UK

Samir Kumar Dhar, Unity Council, Ireland

Saptarshi Mukherjee, New York.

Sitangshu Guha, Bangladesh Minority Coalition, USA

Sushanta Lal Sen, London, UK

Swadesh Barua, Bangladesh Hindu Buddhist Christian Unity Council (BHBCUC), France

Swami Shuvananda Puri Maharaj, Los Angeles, BMC, California

Suparna Chowdhury, Bangladesh

Sutapa Paul, UK

Tarun Kanti Chowdhury, BHBCUC, Europe

Udayan Barua, BHBCUC, Europe

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