Consent condom: 4 hands required to open pack

While lifestyle drugs and products are normally developed in developed economies while the developing world copies the products, the struggling economy of Argentina has come up with this condom, necessitated by demand

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consent condom

Buenos Aires: Argentine sex toy retailer Tulipán has created the world’s first “consent condom”. The condom comes in a unique pack that cannot be opened until at least four hands work on it simultaneously. Two partners must together press the vantage points on the sides of the pack to access the content.

In the West, this is being seen as a discouragement for rape as even sexual offenders in that society have been observed to be alert against acquiring sexually transmitted disease (STD). Elsewhere, the innovation is being seen as a product that would create an atmosphere of consent between partners of a couple.

“Tulipán has always spoken of safe pleasure but for this campaign we understood that we had to talk about the most important thing in every sexual relationship — pleasure is possible only if you both give your consent,” said Joaquin Campins of advertising agency BBDO that is marketing the condom. “If it’s not a yes, it’s a no,” he adds.

In Buenos Aires of Argentina, they are dispensing these limited-edition condoms at bars. It’s free as of now. Users have appreciated it.

Tulipán plans to sell the condoms later.

AHF Argentina, an organisation campaigning for HIV positive patients’ rights, had recently conducted a survey that showed only 14.5% of Argentinian men regularly used condoms. As many as 65% said they used it occasionally. About 20.5% said they had never used a condom.

Interestingly, while lifestyle drugs and products are normally developed in developed economies while the developing world copies the products, the struggling economy of Argentina has come up with this condom, necessitated by demand.

Last year, a self-lubricating condom, which could withstand 1,000 thrusts and more, was developed. Three years ago, a condom in the shape of a honeycomb, Lelo Hex, was designed as a contraception device that would work somewhat even if it ruptured.

Medically, the best has been ST EYE. It’s a condom that changes colours if it encounters pathogens of herpes, HPV, chlamydia or syphilis. A group of young scientists developed it at the Isaac Newton Academy in London. The name of the condom is a reminder of STI (sexually transmitted infection), the alternative term for STD (although infection and disease are technically different).